Requirements Modelling and Specification for Service Oriented Architecture
Ian Graham

Table of contents

Foreword by Professor Neil Maiden

ix

Preface

xi

     1.1      Why projects fail

2

     1.2      Aligning IT with business – speaking a common language

4

                1.2.1        Models

6

     1.3      What is service oriented architecture?

9

                1.3.1        The real user

17

     1.4      Business drivers for SOA

21

     1.5      Technology drivers

22

     1.6      Benefits, pitfalls and prospects

25

                1.6.1        Pitfalls

26

                1.6.2        Post-SOA benefits

28

     1.7      Migration strategies

28

     1.8      Summary

30

     1.9      Bibliographical notes

32

 

 

2  Architecture – Objects, Components, Services

35

     2.1      What is architecture?

35

                2.1.1        Architecture as high level structure

36

                2.1.2        Architecture as design rationale or vision

41

                2.1.3        Architecture and reuse

45

     2.2      Architecture through the ages

46

     2.3      Objects and components

55

                2.3.1        Components for flexibility

58

                2.3.2        Large-scale connectors

60

                2.3.3        How services relate to components

61

     2.4      Architecture and SOA

63

     2.5      Stateless services

69

     2.6      Principles for developing, maintaining and exploiting a SOA

72

     2.7      Summary

74

     2.8      Bibliographical notes

76

 

 

3  Approaches to Requirements Engineering

77

     3.1      Conventional approaches

77

                3.2.1        Approaches based on human factors

80

     3.2      Classic requirements versus use cases

84

                3.2.1        UML basics

84

                3.2.2        Use case models

87

                3.2.3        Formulating requirements

89

     3.3      Problem Frames

92

     3.4      Requirements and business rules

95

     3.5      Establishing and prioritizing the business objectives

96

     3.6      Soft techniques for requirements elicitation

100

                3.6.1        Using interviewing techniques

101

                3.6.2        Repertory grids

103

                3.6.3        Hierarchical task analysis

105

                3.6.4        Object discovery techniques

109

     3.7      Summary

114

     3.8      Bibliographical notes

118

 

 

4  Business Process Modelling

119

     4.1      The origins of need for business process modelling

120

     4.2      Business process modelling in a nutshell

122

     4.3      UML activity diagrams

124

     4.4      BPMN

126

                4.4.1 Fundamental business process modelling patterns

129

                4.4.2 A practical example

132

     4.5      WS-BPEL

136

     4.6      Orchestration and choreography

138

     4.7      Process algebra and Petri nets

140

     4.8      The human side of business process management

144

     4.9      Summary

145

     4.10    Bibliographical notes

146

 

 

5  Catalysis Conversation Analysis

147

     5.1      What is a business process?

147

     5.2      Conversations

150

     5.3      Conversation stereotypes and scripts

154

                5.3.1        Handling exceptions

156

     5.4      Conversations as components

157

     5.5      Contracts and goals

159

     5.6      Conversations, collaborations and services

164

     5.7      Checking model consistency

170

     5.8      Summary

171

     5.9      Bibliographical notes

172

 

 

6  Models of large enterprises

173

     6.1      Business process modelling and SOA in the large

174

     6.2      Business rules in the mission grid

181

     6.3      The mission grid as a roadmap for SOA

184

     6.4      Other approaches

185

     6.5      Summary

186

     6.6      Bibliographical notes

187

 

 

7 Specification modelling

189

     7.1      From requirements to specification

189

     7.2      Some problems with the conventional approach to use cases

191

                7.2.1        Overemphasis on functional decomposition

191

                7.2.2        Lack of clear definition

192

                7.2.3        Controller objects

192

                7.2.4        Use cases and scenarios

192

                7.2.5        Essential or generic use cases

193

                7.2.6        Atomicity

194

                7.2.7        Level of abstraction

195

                7.2.8        Exception handling

195

     7.3      Describing boundary conversations or use cases

197

     7.4      Establishing the type model

201

                7.4.1        State models

203

     7.5      Finding services from state models

208

                7.5.1        Cartooning using agents or coördinators

209

     7.6      Finding business rules

211

     7.7      Ontology, type models and business rules

218

                7.7.1        Rules and rule chaining

219

     7.8      Documenting the specification

222

     7.9      Associations, rules and encapsulation

223

                7.9.1        Integrity rules rulesets and encapsulation

226

     7.10    Summary

229

     7.11    Bibliographical notes

231

               

 

8  Standards

233

     8.1      BPM standards

233

     8.2      Web Services standards

236

     8.3      Other miscellaneous standards

236

     8.4      Bibliographical notes

240

 

 

Appendices

 

A  Requirements engineering and specification patterns

241

B  The fundamental concepts of service oriented architecture

297

 

 

References and bibliography

307

Index

313


Release date: September 2008.  Price: £34.99,
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